Gardening Equipment Market Size, Growth Research Analysis and Share to amass over $ 116.7 billion by 2026

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Feb 02, 2021 (Market Insight Reports) —
Global gardening equipment market Size, Share is projected to reach USD 116.7 billion by 2026, according to the latest research available at Market Study Report LLC, report provides extensively data on market Analysis, Industry, growth, trends and forecasts for the period 2017-2026.

According to the report, the growth of the gardening equipment market is majorly driven by increasing implementation of these equipment by commercial and residential construction industries. In addition to this, technological innovations to save time, energy, and cost have led to the emergence of high-tech equipments such as robotic lawnmowers, thereby increasing the remuneration potential of the market during the forecast period.

Request sample copy of this Report@ https://www.marketstudyreport.com/request-a-sample/1695038/

Also, lawnmowers’ demand is poised to increase in the foreseeable time on account of burgeoning landscaping services in the United States, which will further boost the market size over the estimation period. Moreover, the report cites that the growth is anticipated to be triggered by the application of these equipment in the sports fields like golf courses and government sector for developing assets across public parks and other governmental

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Simple gardening CC for The Sims 4 to save you hours



a close up of a green door


© Provided by Extra Time Media


If you were not gifted with the virtue of patience, gardening in real life is probably not your thing. And so, like with many things that’s not worth bothering with in the real world, you might resort to a virtual alternative in The Sims 4.

While gardening is still far less cumbersome (especially if you use cheats), it can still feel rather time consuming, especially if you are keeping time in Sim hours.

You have to get your Sim to buy a seed packet, open that packet and hope you got what you were looking for, drag the seed into your planter and then plant it. While we appreciate the realism of mimic the process in the real world, Sim life is sometimes too short for real-life levels of gardening.

Absolutely Radishing Garden Planters: Sims 4 CC for avid gardeners




a room filled with furniture and vase of flowers on a table: Absolutely Radishing Cc Ravasheen


© Provided by Extra Time Media
Absolutely Radishing Cc Ravasheen

You probably guessed what was coming. Yes, it is that ancient Sims proverb: luckily, there is a mod/CC for that.

Created by Ravasheen (also check out their

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Want to pick up gardening tips? Here are some podcasts, online newsletters to check out

Gardeners often like to talk about their favorite pastime, but these days, folks might find themselves digging in the dirt alone. Still, planters and growers can smile when tips and tidbits about gardening land in their email inbox or make their way through their earbuds.  



a bird perched on a tree branch: Know how to prune live oaks to protect the trees and promote growth. Removing branches all the way to the source is best.


© Contributed by Daphne Richards
Know how to prune live oaks to protect the trees and promote growth. Removing branches all the way to the source is best.

From selecting fertilizer to cutting back perennials to growing orchids, gardening e-newsletters and podcasts often cover an array of topics. For those who sign up, newsletters can be received regularly from various gardening organizations, publications, nurseries and others. 

Podcasts likewise are created by numerous sources, from home gardeners to professionals. Podcasts run anywhere from just a few minutes to much longer. They are available through a variety of platforms or on many of these programs’ websites. These programs can be informative and occasionally entertaining. As a bonus, gardeners can enjoy relating to kindred spirits. 

Here’s a sampling of what’s available for plant lovers who are eager to read up, listen up or both: 

“The Old Farmer’s Almanac” (almanac.com): Many people recognize the long-lasting, familiar “The Old

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Cornwall Library presents winter gardening program Feb. 7

CORNWALL – The Cornwall Library presents Winter Gardening

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Learn gardening tips on zoom through a York County ‘Master Your Garden’ program

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The York County Public Library, Poquoson Public Library, and York-Poquoson Master Gardeners are hosting a series of educational gardening seminars on Zoom. (WYDaily/ Annie Gallo)
The York County Public Library, Poquoson Public Library, and York-Poquoson Master Gardeners are hosting a series of educational gardening seminars on Zoom. (WYDaily/ Annie Gallo)

Get prepared for a beautiful garden this spring and summer by learning some tips and tricks from a local virtual Master Your Garden class.

York County and Poquoson Public Libraries are partnering with the York-Poquoson Virginia Cooperative Extension office to host a series of virtual classes presented by Master Gardeners.

Master Gardeners’ mission as trained volunteers in partnership with the York–Poquoson, VCE agency, is to provide gardening educational opportunities to the public through research-based gardening programs and activities to enhance the environment and community. For more information on Master Gardeners click here.

The Master Your Garden series features a variety of Saturday seminars to help community members improve their gardening skills. Below are the classes on the schedule:

Starting from Seed (Feb. 6)

  • Join Master Gardener Nate Brauner and learn simple techniques and secrets to growing flowers, vegetables and favorite plants from seeds at home.

Pruning (Feb. 13)

  • Master Gardener Mary Boxer will lead the class to teach the safe and proper use of pruning tools to improve the health, longevity and appearance of
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Gardening: Raising exotic orchids in Philadelphia requires ingenuity

by Stan Cutler

The giant hawkmoth of Madagascar is a bizarre creature, famous for its foot-long proboscis. It’s discovery in 1882 was a scientific moment akin to the measurement of starlight in 1919 that proved Einstein’s theory of curved space. The capture of the moth proved Darwin’s theory that races of plants and animals evolve in relationships with each other.

In 1862, a friend sent Darwin a couple of orchid specimens (angreacum sesquipedale) that had foot-long pollen sacs descending from the flowers with tiny pools of nectar in the bottom. Darwin had no doubt that there was a moth in Madagascar with a proboscis long enough to reach the nectar.  His prediction was dismissed, even ridiculed, by many in the scientific community. Twenty years later, in the habitat where the orchids grew, the giant hawkmoth with the insanely long tongue was discovered. 

My wife, Valerie, cares for a specimen of the weird orchid. She likes the one she’s holding in the picture because it’s strange, not because it smells nice or is exceptionally pretty. In fact, she finds the scent unpleasant. I have olfactory challenges and can’t detect its scent at all.

The sesquipedale  is the only angraecum  with

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UNR Extension to offer gardening workshops

University of Nevada, Reno Extension and their certified Master Gardeners are holding a variety of online “Gardening in Small Places” workshops throughout the spring for Southern Nevada gardeners.

Classes cover vegetable gardening, composting and solving gardening problems.

“Spring is the perfect time to work on your gardening skills,” said Extension Program Officer Elaine Fagin. “These workshops provide the perfect opportunity to learn about growing and then put them into practice.”
Details on the workshops include:

Feb. 20, 9 to 11:30 a.m., Vegetable Gardening Zoom Class. This workshop is geared to help the beginning gardener, returning gardener, gardeners from outside the desert or current gardeners that just want a little refresher, learn how to be successful growing their own food in the Mojave Desert. Registration is $10.

March 20, 9 to 11:30 a.m., Composting Zoom Class. If you think you can’t compost in the Mojave Desert, or if you’ve tried to compost in the desert and haven’t been successful, join our compost class. If you eat fruits and vegetables and throw any parts of them away, you have the makings of compost. Let Angela O’Callaghan, Extension associate professor and social horticulture specialist, show you. Registration is $10.

May

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Gardening Etcetera: Pining for a Ponderosa? Know this before you plant | Local

Wildlife are irresistibly drawn to Ponderosas. Some, like woodpeckers, bluebirds, nuthatches, brown bats, and some squirrels make their homes within its cavities or the hollows of dead trees. The tufted-eared Abert’s squirrel builds a huge nest (drey) high up on the south side of a Ponderosa trunk. A plethora of birds indulge in pine nuts, insects, and other arthropods gleaned from beneath the bark and within the branches.

For the past 100 years, many forests have encountered human suppression of forest fires, resulting in dense Ponderosa stands. Trees growing in close proximity deprive each other of sunshine and compete strongly for nutrients and water. As a result, these forests often have spindly, drooping, sparse-needled pines with root systems only as wide as a tree’s crown.

The specimens will never grow to the picturesque, open, park-like woods one pictures when envisioning a Ponderosa pine forest. The only way to turn these forests back to their former glory is through proper management. The Four Forest Restoration Initiative is aiming to do just that here in Northern Arizona. It will hopefully: restore structure, pattern, composition, and health of fire-adapted Ponderosa pine ecosystems, reduce fuels and the risk of unnaturally severe wildfires, and provide

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Tropical Gardening: Time to celebrate annual Hawaii Island Wiliwili Festival

Our forests and landscapes can change rapidly.

Hawaii’s endemic Erythrina sandwichensis, or wiliwili, is a colorful flowering tree of the dryland forests, and is vulnerable to threats such as feral pigs, goats, insects and diseases. According to Jen Lawson, executive director of the Waikoloa Dry Forest Initiative, the group is responsible for protecting a 275-acre tract, where rare and endangered shrubs and trees are safe from wild goats and other grazing animals.

Normally there would be an opportunity to visit this little known piece of our paradise as part of the Hawaii Island Wiliwili Festival, but because of COVID-19, Jen is encouraging folks to visit the group’s website, https:www.waikoloadryforest/wiliwilifestival/, for a virtual tour and other activities. There will be limited guided tours at the protected site from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. on Feb. 12-13, but with COVID restrictions in place, they are encouraging folks to go virtual.

Get involved in this great environmental endeavor.

Warming weather has created ideal conditions for Myrtle Rust (Austropuccinia psidii) to cause defoliation, dieback and even death of our beloved ohia and many other related species in the Myrtle family. About 150 species are susceptible including Mountain Apple, guava, eucalyptus, callistemon, melaleuca and

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SKIP RICHTER: It’s spring vegetable gardening time | Brazos Life

Timing is important

We are nearing the end of the season for planting cool-season veggies. There is still time to get in seeds of lettuce, spinach, beets, Swiss chard, carrots, peas (snap, English and snow), radishes and turnips. We can also set out transplants of broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, Chinese cabbage, bok choi, collards, kohlrabi, parsley and onions now, but don’t delay.

It is also time to plant potatoes. Cut the potatoes into egg-sized pieces with at least one eye each. Dust the cut surfaces with sulfur and set them on a wire screen to “heal over” for 2-3 days. This reduces losses from fresh-cut potatoes decaying in the soil.

Warm-season veggies like beans, squash, tomatoes and peppers go in after the average last frost date, so early March is a good time to plant them out in the garden. Don’t delay too long with these crops, either, or summer will arrive to minimize the harvest.

Check out our new Vegetable Garden Planting Dates chart, which provides both ideal and marginal planting times for 40 vegetables as well as our average first and last freeze dates.

Give ’em a boost

New transplants really respond to a dose of liquid fertilizer at

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