The best new interior design books which will set the tone for 2021

Giles Kime picks out some of the finest interiors books of 2020 for those seeking inspiration in 2021.

In the era of Instagram and Pinterest, it might come as a surprise that the chunky interior-design monograph remains such an important resource. Yet well-thumbed books, such as Roger Banks-Pye’s Inspirational Interiors and A Life Of Design by David Hicks, have become an important part of their aesthetic legacies.

Not all interior-design books, however, are aesthetic totems. They also offer a brilliant way to celebrate something that has been overlooked, notably Bevis Hillier’s book, Art Deco, which was published in 1968 and had a transformative effect on the way the style was perceived (as well as coining the term itself — before that, it was known as Art Moderne). This year, the glittering prize in that category undoubtedly goes to Lulu Lytle for Rattan (£50; Rizzoli), which explores the role that this malleable, but robust fibre played in some of the 20th century’s most memorable interiors and images, appearing in everything from depictions of Titanic’s Café Parisien to a portrait of Churchill, Stalin and Truman at Potsdam in 1945.

Lulu Lytle’s Rattan (£50; Rizzoli)

Another type of interiors book sets

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Fake big name books suggested for decorating home

Fake big name books suggested for decorating home




a close up of a book shelf


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Decorating a home with creativity can be interesting. Social media star Maddy Burciaga suggest using fake books. Bookcases do make a nice appearance in homes.

Fake book decorations would benefit those who do not read much. But fake expensive books could better the view in homes that already have loaded bookcases.

Negative reaction did show up, “Oh yeah, we knew everything in their lives was fake, but even cardboard books? These people have no dignity,” More here.

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When you miss gardening, turn to these books for comfort and inspiration

CORVALLIS – If you can’t garden, why not read about it? Books bring us comfort when the gloomy weather of winter is upon us. Even gardeners who love winter enjoy a good read.

Add a fire and a cup of tea and relax with one of these 11 books recommended by Oregon State University Extension Service horticulturists. There is something for every reader – a memoir by Hope Jahren tells the story of two scientists and their love for trees; Extension’s popular “Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington” is heavy with photos of both coniferous and deciduous trees; Olivier Flippi writes about the important subject of gardening in dry climates; and a book on short-season vegetable gardening is perfect for central and eastern Oregon gardeners.

Since we couldn’t seem to stop at 10, we’ve given you a list of 11. They’d make fine holiday gifts. Find them online, or check with your local library or bookstores.

“The Gardener’s Atlas,” Dr. John Grimshaw

“For gardeners who love to know the origin of all their favorite plants this is a gem of information. It probes into the history and origin of these plants and who discovered them. The author makes the

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Turn to gardening books for comfort and inspiration



a sign in the middle of a forest: Gardening and tree books can help while away the winter until spring returns


© COURTESY OF OREGON STATE EXTENSION
Gardening and tree books can help while away the winter until spring returns

If you can’t garden, why not read about it? Books bring us comfort when the gloomy weather of winter is upon us. Even gardeners who love winter enjoy a good read.

Since we couldn’t seem to stop at 10, we’ve given you a list of 11. They’d make fine holiday gifts. Find them online, or check with your local library or bookstores.

“The Gardeners,” Dr. John Grimshaw

“For gardeners who love to know the origin of all their favorite plants this is a gem of information. It probes into the history and origin of these plants and who discovered them. The author makes the sharing of plant discovery since the 1500s very entertaining and educates the reader on how many of these ornamental plants were also used for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. The book is filled with excellent photos and maps of plant origins to support the storytelling.”

— Steve Reinquist, OSU Extension horticulturist, Douglas County

“Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington,” Ed Jensen, Oregon State University Extension Service

“I really like “Trees to Know in Oregon.”  It is a

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