Big Real-Estate Firms Turn Buyers of Their Own Shares

Some publicly traded real-estate companies have found a buyer for their shares, despite empty offices, deserted hotels and reeling shopping malls—the companies themselves.

Real-estate owners, including

SL Green Realty Corp.

and

Healthcare Trust of America Inc.,

say stock-market investors have significantly undervalued their property holdings compared with what they could fetch in the private market. While some of these companies authorized buying back their own shares even before the coronavirus pandemic, they are betting that with a vaccine rollout under way, travel, office work and mall shopping will bounce back after a terrible year for major property types.

Brookfield Asset Management Inc.

took this strategy one step further last week, when it offered to buy the nearly 40{ac967ad544075fb2f6bcea1234f8d91da186cac15e616dc329e302b7c7326b8c} stake in

Brookfield Property Partners

LP it doesn’t already own for $5.9 billion. Brookfield Property, which BAM spun off about eight years ago, is one of the world’s largest real-estate investors and owns the giant office and retail complexes Brookfield Place in New York and London’s Canary Wharf.

The stock market “doesn’t properly value or appreciate the quality of the assets that we own,”

Brian Kingston,

managing partner of BAM’s real-estate group, said last week.

Shares of public mall and office companies

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Real Estate Opportunities For Buyers In 2021

Chris is the Co-Founder and CEO of FlipOut Academy with 257 RE deals completed since 2006 and 15+ years financial advisory experience.

When the markets seized up during the spring of 2020, it became quite difficult to get real estate deals done. Even though investors were able to buy assets in some kind of distressed state, banks weren’t physically open to be able to finance them. Now many banks are back open for business, but they have also become more selective in their loan process. 

The big fallout last March caused the real estate community to start thinking about upcoming opportunities. But then the stimulus checks kicked in, unemployment numbers rose and PPP loans were issued. This stimulated the market, which gave a false sense of reality about what was really going on. The short-term market stimulation made it difficult to for real estate buyers to find opportunities to make the right trade at the right price point.

Then, institutional investors like hedge funds and larger private funds had cash to deploy into real estate. If you watched what happened in March, you saw the stock market crash rapidly, sending shock waves of fear across institutional investors who said,

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Houston real estate agents caught on tape steering buyers away from homes with less commission

“I’m not even going to show it to them, to be honest with you,” the real estate agent said. “I can’t help you to sell something that’s wiping out my profession.”

In recording after recording, Houston real estate agents are heard saying they will not show certain homes to their clients — even though the houses meet all the buyers’ desires.

Real estate agents are required by law to act in the best interests of their clients, but interactions recorded by California-based discount brokerage REX show that many actually steer clients away from homes that offer less lucrative commissions.

The recordings have come to light as high-profile lawsuits, including one brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, question the way real estate agents are compensated.

If those cases, or cases that follow, succeed in lowering real estate commissions to levels more in line, for instance, with the flat 1.18 percent commission seen in the United Kingdom in 2018 it could save homeowners upward of $70 billion a year — while costing agents the same amount.

Jack Ryan, REX’s chief executive, credits the recorded conversations with sparking the DOJ suit

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Real estate sector keen on infrastructure status, tax incentives for home buyers in union budget



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The real estate sector, which took a hard hit due to COVID-19, is pinning hopes on the union budget to be presented on Monday for easing regulatory norms and for steps which will help in completion of pending projects and sale of build-up houses.

The sector has also been demanding infrastructure status. Apart from the sector suffering a sharp dip in sales due to COVID-19, there was also exodus of migrant labourers from cities which impacted execution of projects.

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Developers said construction work had not picked up projects due to liquidity crisis.

Navin Raheja, Chairman, Raheja Developers, said the real estate sector is the driver of the economy and a boost to the sector will have trickle-down impact.

“People on average invest their one-third of their savings in real estate. The real estate sector is largely suffering due to over-regulation and incomplete projects that has led to delays and defaults. Though the government has put the system online, developers still need to approach 50 departments for approvals. This needs to be taken care of. There should be restructuring of the past loans to complete the projects,” he said.

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Real estate sector keen on infrastructure status, tax incentives for home buyers



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© Provided by Zee News


New Delhi: The real estate sector, which took a hard hit due to COVID-19, is pinning hopes on the union budget to be presented on Monday for easing regulatory norms and for steps which will help in completion of pending projects and sale of build-up houses.

The sector has also been demanding infrastructure status. Apart from the sector suffering a sharp dip in sales due to COVID-19, there was also exodus of migrant labourers from cities which impacted execution of projects.

Developers said construction work had not picked up projects due to liquidity crisis. Navin Raheja, Chairman, Raheja Developers, said the real estate sector is the driver of the economy and a boost to the sector will have trickle-down impact. “People on average invest their one-third of their savings in real estate. The real estate sector is largely suffering due to over-regulation and incomplete projects that has led to delays and defaults. Though the government has put the system online, developers still need to approach 50 departments for approvals. This needs to be taken care of. There should be restructuring of the past loans to complete the projects,” he said.

R K Arora, Chairman Supertech

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Midway Hollow’s designs and location lure buyers

The cluster of cottages, ranch-style homes and midcentury-modern designs in Midway Hollow is drawing buyers who enjoy its central location north of Love Field, according to Allie Beth Allman & Associates.

The community offers many homes that were built in the 1950s and recently renovated. Over the last few years, their values have doubled or tripled, said a company spokesperson.

Here are three Midway Hollow homes Allie Beth Allman & Associates recommends.

The remodeled four-bedroom home at 4130 Walnut Hill Drive is situated on a corner lot. Offered by Alex Perry, the one-story design features an eat-in kitchen with a large island, stainless-steel appliances and white cabinetry. The primary suite has a walk-in closet. The backyard is large enough for a pool.

The four-bedroom residence at 4058 Davila Drive is listed by Tracy Lewis. The kitchen has an island and stainless-steel appliances. The primary bathroom includes a separate tub and shower and a walk-in closet. Plantation shutters are in almost every room.

Located in the gated Walnut Meadows neighborhood, the three-bedroom home at 4105 Walnut Meadow Lane is offered by Erin Young Garrett and Hattee Taylor.

This custom-built residence mixes wood, marble and ceramic tile

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