Affordable housing shows no impact on real estate values in Colorado Springs neighborhoods, study shows | Homeless

As Colorado Springs City Council members on Tuesday consider approving the spending plan for incoming federal Housing and Urban Development funding, a new map shows property values have not decreased in any city neighborhood because of affordable housing projects. 

The information refutes what’s often the leading cause of neighborhood opposition to such development.

“According to the data we have, there is not a single place in the city of Colorado Springs where a low-income project has brought down property values in the last five years,” said Steve Posey, HUD program manager.

That’s also not the case in other states, said Daryn Murphy, vice president of development for Wisconsin-based Commonwealth Development Corp.

“We hear that argument quite often, but we haven’t seen where it actually plays out,” he said.

At least six sections of the city where tax-credited affordable-housing projects have been built are among the neighborhoods that have seen property values increase the most in recent years, Posey noted.

City officials expect to receive an estimated $5 million in HUD funding to address priorities for affordable housing, homelessness prevention, economic development, nonprofit assistance and improvements in low-income neighborhoods. The funding starts April 1 and covers the second year of a

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Housing Vouchers for Homeless People Routinely Denied

It’s been more than a year since Rebeka and her family lost their apartment in Queens. Since January 2020, they have been living in a hotel — a hotel operating as a homeless shelter for families.

“This whole year has been different,” Rebeka explains. “Christmas, New Year’s, Thanksgiving, everything is just different.”


What You Need To Know

  • Thousands of people experiencing homelessness  are given housing vouchers by the city to find housing
  • An exclusive NY1 investigation has found those vouchers are routinely denied by landlords and realtors, which is an illegal source of income discrimination 
  • In the first 10 months of 2019, on average every month, only a tiny slice of those with vouchers were able to find apartments 

She has two children and worked for the city until the pandemic hit the five boroughs. NY1 has changed her name to protect her family’s privacy.

When we met on a cold day in December, Rebeka was carrying a large stack of papers. On it was the names and phone numbers of management companies and realtors.

“This is a prospective list that I was given by my shelter,” she said. “And this is what I have been doing, making calls. I

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