Kitchen Rugs? We Love This Controversial Design Trend

Do rugs belong in kitchens? You might think this is a controversial topic which splits the clean freaks from the comfort kings. But, the answer is actually simple. It’s a resounding “yes.” Kitchen area rugs are one of the best additions to your home, as they provide warmth, break up hard surfaces and are vacuum friendly.

For such an easy purchase, it’s amazing the difference the best kitchen rug can make to your home. Here are some of the best reasons to invest in a new kitchen rug. Many of which are great ammo when it comes to swaying partners or roommates as to why you need one.

  • Aesthetic – Kitchen rugs look good. We’re living in a fashion-driven, style-conscious world, and we want to look our best. Why put so much effort into choosing the exact shade of pale grey for the walls when you’re not going to complete it with a beautiful kitchen rug for the floor?
  • Temperature – You can add a layer of warmth to your floor with a kitchen area rug. Place them where you stand the most, and keep your feet warm while you cook.
  • Slipping – Tiles and wooden floors can be slippery,
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Be mine: Ideas for a safe, healthy Valentine’s Day everyone can love – Lifestyle – Holland Sentinel

“Valentine’s Day in a Pandemic” sounds like the title of a terrible album, or maybe the least-romantic date night movie ever. Unfortunately, it’s also reality in 2021.

That doesn’t mean the day can’t be fun, said experts who suggested ways to stay safe while celebrating.

Dr. Alson Inaba, a pediatric emergency medicine specialist at the Kapiʻolani Medical Center for Women & Children in Honolulu, knows more than a little about matters of the heart: He was the first to teach CPR to the rhythm of “Stayin’ Alive,” an idea that spread worldwide.

For the sake of staying alive, nobody should forget the dangers of the coronavirus, he said. Even as people get vaccinated, they still need to protect themselves and others by wearing a mask, keeping a safe distance from people outside their household, avoiding large gatherings, washing hands and not sharing food and drinks.

But don’t despair, romantics.

Inaba, who also has a knack for speaking in phrases that would be right at home on a Valentine’s Day card, added, “It is still OK to share your heart, but be smart.”

This is the year to get creative, said Maya Vadiveloo, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition

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AHA News: Ideas for a Safe, Healthy Valentine’s Day Everyone Can Love | Health News

By American Heart Association News, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 3, 2021 (American Heart Association News) — “Valentine’s Day in a Pandemic” sounds like the title of a terrible album, or maybe the least-romantic date night movie ever. Unfortunately, it’s also reality in 2021.

That doesn’t mean the day can’t be fun, said experts who suggested ways to stay safe while celebrating.

Dr. Alson Inaba, a pediatric emergency medicine specialist at the Kapi’olani Medical Center for Women & Children in Honolulu, knows more than a little about matters of the heart: He was the first to teach CPR to the rhythm of “Stayin’ Alive,” an idea that spread worldwide.

For the sake of staying alive, nobody should forget the dangers of the coronavirus, he said. Even as people get vaccinated, they still need to protect themselves and others by wearing a mask, keeping a safe distance from people outside their household, avoiding large gatherings, washing hands and not sharing food and drinks.

But don’t despair, romantics.

Inaba, who also has a knack for speaking in phrases that would be right at home on a Valentine’s Day card, added, “It is still OK to share your heart, but be smart.”

This

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Ideas for a safe, healthy Valentine’s Day everyone can love

“Valentine’s Day in a Pandemic” sounds like the title of a terrible album, or maybe the least-romantic date night movie ever. Unfortunately, it’s also reality in 2021.

That doesn’t mean the day can’t be fun, said experts who suggested ways to stay safe while celebrating.

Dr. Alson Inaba, a pediatric emergency medicine specialist at the Kapiʻolani Medical Center for Women & Children in Honolulu, knows more than a little about matters of the heart: He was the first to teach CPR to the rhythm of “Stayin’ Alive,” an idea that spread worldwide.

For the sake of staying alive, nobody should forget the dangers of the coronavirus, he said. Even as people get vaccinated, they still need to protect themselves and others by wearing a mask, keeping a safe distance from people outside their household, avoiding large gatherings, washing hands and not sharing food and drinks.

But don’t despair, romantics.

Inaba, who also has a knack for speaking in phrases that would be right at home on a Valentine’s Day card, added, “It is still OK to share your heart, but be smart.”

This is the year to get creative, said Maya Vadiveloo, an assistant professor in the department of nutrition

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Six Designer-Approved Kitchen Sink Styles We Love

The right sink can upgrade your entire kitchen. “A well-designed sink needs to be both functional and beautiful,” interior designer Emma Beryl explains. “If a sink isn’t functional, it will reduce the overall efficiency of your kitchen and cooking workflow, and if it isn’t attractive, it can compromise the overall design of the space.”



a room filled with furniture and vase of flowers on a kitchen counter: Jennifer Hughes


© Provided by Martha Stewart Living
Jennifer Hughes

So, what elements are essential to a stylish, yet practical kitchen sink? For starters, it should be sized to suit your family’s unique needs. “A sink that is at least nine-inches deep is crucial for hiding dirty pots and dishes, and preventing splashing over the sides,” says interior designer Lauren Ramirez. “A durable, but also beautiful finish is equally important to help hide water spots and create a sense of luxury while taking care of messy business.” Curious what kinds of kitchen sinks our interior designer friends turn to time and time again? From innovative stainless-steel styles to hammered copper designs and more, several designers share their favorites ahead.

Related: Farmhouse-Inspired White Kitchen Ideas

Undermount Minded

Designed to ensure that the edge of the sink is below the level of the countertop,

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Clever storage design ideas you’ll love with House Beautiful kitchens at Homebase

The House Beautiful kitchens at Homebase offer smart storage specially designed to help you utilise every inch of space and get the most out of your kitchen.



a kitchen with a sink and a mirror: The House Beautiful kitchens at Homebase offer ample smart storage, specially designed to help you utilise every inch of space and get the most out of your kitchen.


© Homebase
The House Beautiful kitchens at Homebase offer ample smart storage, specially designed to help you utilise every inch of space and get the most out of your kitchen.

Newly launched, you can now get the kitchen of your dreams with the House Beautiful range, and our innovative, space-saving storage solutions will save you time and money – allowing you to be more efficient in your kitchen so you can spend more time cooking your favourite dishes.

‘There are so many ways to enhance your kitchen storage space. These ideas are practical but will also really add the wow factor to your kitchen,’ says Louise Pearce, Editor-in-Chief, House Beautiful.



a man standing in front of a refrigerator: Cutting edge integrated handle design feature – House Beautiful Westbourne Kitchen in Cobble, exclusively at Homebase


© Homebase
Cutting edge integrated handle design feature – House Beautiful Westbourne Kitchen in Cobble, exclusively at Homebase



a kitchen with a sink and a mirror: House Beautiful Westbourne Kitchen in Cobble, exclusively at Homebase


© Homebase
House Beautiful Westbourne Kitchen in Cobble, exclusively at Homebase

For starters, our pull-out storage solutions are a must-have. The ultimate in ergonomic design, it will deliver your items to you without you having to bend down or reach up into the back

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Gardening Etcetera: Cataloging a true love of all things seeds | Local

For vegetables, I look for things like hardiness, days to maturity, approximate produce size, and water requirements. Since we live in a cold and dry climate, care must be given to these options. But I also pay attention to what the catalog writers say about sweetness, ease of growing, and hours of sunlight needed. Sun requirements are specifically varied in the Flagstaff area as some sites are shaded by our Ponderosa Pines and other areas, like Baderville and Doney Park, get more sun than some plants appreciate. For flowers, I look for blooming time, height, pest resistance, and if it attracts pollinators or not.

As you may have guessed already, not all seed companies are equal. Seed companies often rely on seeds grown far away and not adapted to the local climates. Seed patenting is also becoming an issue for both large and small organizations relying on seed sales for their livelihood. Beyond the fancy catalogs, look for companies committed to quality seeds meant to grow in your type of climate. Not only will they try to grow as many seeds of their own at their location but they will also contract local growers to produce quality vegetable, fruit, herb,

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‘Statement Home’ in Texas Seeks Buyer in Love With Over-the-Top Design

It sounds like the setup to a hackneyed joke or an off-kilter riddle, but bear with us.

What do you get when a couple of geologists decorate a five-bedroom, five-bathroom house?

Answer: a glitzy, over-the-top 11,500-square-foot mansion in Midland, TX, with exotic taxidermy, safari animal hides, and enough light fixtures to keep the entire neighborhood lit.

Because of the couple’s shared passion for geology, landscaped rocks at the $2.65 million home were sourced from local quarries.

The listing agent, Norma Pine with Pine & Beckett Realtors, tells us that the lavishly decorated residence is on the market only three years after the sellers built it.


She also reports that there are 38 light fixtures in the living room alone—including a chandelier.

Above the kitchen island is a fixture created out of a vintage watering wheel, sourced from a farm. Paired with that innovation is a chef-grade cooking area accented in black, gold, and white. It has two cooking stations, a double-door, see-through fridge, and a custom, handmade hood above the range.

The dining room has walls of inlaid stone, and horns filled with peacock feathers anchor the doorway. Entertaining outside is a breeze, thanks to a covered, outdoor kitchen.

One

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Book review: ‘Fearless Gardening: Be Bold, Break the Rules, and Grow What You Love’

“Fearless Gardening: Be Bold, Break the Rules, and Grow What You Love” by Loree Bohl ($24.95, Timber Press): Bohl‘s messages of “yes, you can” and “yes, you should” are the perfect antidote to a world filled with worry and a sense of helplessness toward the unknown.

Here, the Portland-based author, who also produces the empowering blog, ”Danger Garden,” calls out to us to be adventurous; to unlock our passion and have fun while creating the garden we want.

The 256-page paperback begins with stories of rare plant collectors and unabashed rule breakers Ruth Bancroft and Ganna Walska, “enemies of the average” who led Bohl to her practical and rebellious gardening commandments.

garden book review

Fearless Gardening: Be Bold, Break the Rules, and Grow What You LoveTimber Press

In the final chapter, the author profiles seven inspiring Pacific Northwest gardens and describes lessons she has learned from each very personal paradise.

Photographs and captions provide information on unique designs and a large variety of plants found in unexpected places. A Opuntia ‘Santa Rita’ cactus, or something like it, blooms outside McMenamins Kennedy School in Northeast Portland.

This is not a traditional how-to guide, but there are frugal tips, like using discarded pie

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Love of gardening, sharing recipes leads to cookbooks, website for Quincy woman | Lifestyles

QUINCY — A retirement plan to start a hobby garden for sustainably-grown fruits and vegetables led to a second career for a Quincy woman — and reinforced her love of cooking.

Rebecca Bobier and her husband Dave retired in 2015, moving from South Dakota to Quincy to be closer to family, and started raising strawberries, organic blueberries, tomatoes and other crops.

“I started a little Facebook page just to let people know where we were selling our produce,” Bobier said. “We called ourselves the Farm Stand. It was a mobile operation. We’d pick, and then we’d go sell.”

A request for a recipe led Bobier to start posting seasonal favorites to go along with the produce available for sale, then someone asked her how to make homemade noodles.

“I told Dave about it and said I’m not sure I can just tell her and she’d be able to do it,” Bobier said. “He said let’s just make a video, put it on the page and she can watch it. That was our very first video.”

Before long, the Facebook followers asked for a cookbook, and Bobier compiled right at 100 of her family favorites.

Now six cookbooks — with a

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