Alan Carr has awkward moment on The One Show as Priyanka Chopra Jonas mistakes him for interior designer

Alan Carr may be known to UK audiences as one of the nation’s leading stand-up comedians and chat show hosts, but to busy Hollywood star Priyanka Chopra Jonas, he might as well be an interior designer.



Alan Carr standing in front of a computer: During an appearance on The One Show, Priyanka Chopra Jonas mistook Alan Carr for an interior designer.


© BBC
During an appearance on The One Show, Priyanka Chopra Jonas mistook Alan Carr for an interior designer.

And, to be fair, considering the Chatty Man host was appearing on The One Show to promote the next series of Interior Design Masters, you can definitely forgive Priyanka for thinking that’s exactly what Alan does for a living.



Priyanka posing for the camera: Priyanka Chopra


© BBC
Priyanka Chopra

Related: The Crown star has tech fail during live interview on The One Show

Also appearing on the BBC show to promote her new book Unfinished, Priyanka provided awkwardness vampires with an absolute feast when she told Alan that what he does is “an integral part of most people’s lives”.

“We just finished doing up our house, just now in LA,” she began. “And it was the first time in about 15 years that I’ve spent time picking colours and cushions, so I think what you do is such an integral part of most people’s lives. So thank you,

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14 Common Design Mistakes You Might Be Making

  • The Guide
  • Interior-design experts reveal the style bloopers they see most often and how to banish them from your home forever.

     •  

    Ever wish you had a team of design experts to walk through your home and tell you what doesn’t feel quite right—and why? You’re in luck: Here, nine Denver-area interior designers give us the skinny on common style bloopers and the secrets to banishing them from your rooms forever.

    Planning A Room

    Ahh, a blank slate. You’ve got a room you’re ready to refresh, and you can’t wait to fill it with beautiful new things: perhaps a Chesterfield sofa, a Danish modern console, or that artwork you’ve had your eye on for two years? Not so fast, our experts say. Here’s where we all tend to misstep before we’ve even chosen a paint color.

    Mistake 1: Glossing Over the Layout

    “[When we’re hired to do a remodel], we almost always see rooms with all of the elements out of scale”—think: furnishings too small or too big, fixtures the wrong size—says Joey Rheem, marketing director for Studio Thomas. “Clients buy furniture, rugs, and art without creating

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    The most common interior design mistakes

    The most common interior design mistakes


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    Nine interior design mistakes that will make your home look dated

    From the stamp duty holiday to people looking to change their lives amid the Covid-19 pandemic, there’s a lot of competition in the housing market at the moment,  meaning sellers must ensure to present their homes in the best possible light.

    Now Deirdre Mc Gettrick, CEO furniture and furnishing website ufurnish.com, revealed nine common interior faux-pas that could well put off prospective buyers by making your property look cluttered, outdated or smaller than it really is.  

    Among her top tips are to avoid open shelves that make a room look messy, as well as hanging curtains too low, which creates the illustion of a more cramped space. 

    Following trends too closely, such as an explosion of florals if you’re into the ‘cottagecore’ look could also deter buyers, so you might want to consider a lick of neutral paint to attract more interest.   

    1. Open-shelves and wardrobes

    Deirdre Mc Gettrick, CEO of interior designer retailing website ufurnish.com, revealed nine common interior faux-pas that will make your house look dated. She said open shelves look stylish in pictures, but are actually unpractical (stock picture)

    Deirdre said that although open-shelves and wardrobes look nice in pictures, they are often unpractical and untidy.  

    ‘The

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    WSJ Wealth Adviser Briefing: Dollars Not Shares, Pet Product Bulls, Interior Design Mistakes

    Special purpose acquisition companies are having a moment in the sun, and they’re making their way into the wealth management industry, Larry Roth, founder and managing partner of RLR Strategic Partners, told Barron’s.

    Though they have been around in some form since the 1990s, SPACs have grown in popularity in recent years. As of Dec. 1, there were 201 IPOs of SPACs in 2020, with gross proceeds of $69.6 billion, according to SPACInsider, more than double the 59 transactions in 2019.

    With the acquisition frenzy that’s swept the wealth management industry in recent years, will it be long before SPACs come calling on RIAs and broker-dealers? To be sure, wealth management firms should conduct full due diligence on any acquisition suitor who comes calling. That said, if and when the moment comes, a SPAC might make the most sense for some late-growth-stage companies as a way to raise financing that doesn’t carry the baggage or costs of traditional IPOs, debt or direct private-equity buyouts.

    Below, some of the best analysis and insight from WSJ writers and columnists, the Dow Jones Newswires team and occasionally beyond, on investing, the wealth-management business and more.

    CORONAVIRUS OUTLOOK

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    How to Avoid the 5 Worst Bedroom Interior-Design Mistakes

    MAKING conference calls from under the covers was once a sick-day anomaly. Now, of course, you can spend a whole workday supine, with your boss none the wiser. But when you blur the borders between desk and duvet, said Brooklyn designer Highlyann Krasnow, “it becomes much more difficult to view the bedroom as a sanctuary.”

    The need to compromise our inner sanctums so we can WFH has turned Mik Hollis’s pre-Covid pet peeve—TVs and other screens in the bedroom—into a bête noire. Once the factory whistle blows, the Pasadena, Calif., designer said, “homes need at least one space that is a respite from the ubiquity of screens.”

    Some bedroom-decorating missteps were already bad ideas before the pandemic and remain so now. It’s just that we’re in our homes so much more today, we rub up against these errors more frequently. Here, designers tell us the six most vexing bedroom décor goofs they see people make again and again, and what you should do instead.

    Fat Furniture

    Want a surefire way to make yourself feel like Alice in Wonderland after the “Eat Me” cake has made her balloon? Cram bulky pieces into your bedroom. Bed platforms that jut out and upholstered

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