Valentine’s dinners at restaurants in Southlake, Grapevine

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Coriander-cured beef tenderloin with Ecuadorian potato cake and cranberry mojo on chef Stephan Pyles’ Valentine’s week menu at Fireside Pies.

Handout photo

Legendary Texas chefs Dean Fearing and Stephan Pyles both have Tarrant County outlets now, and both have Valentine’s menus for next weekend.

Sky Creek Kitchen, the restaurant at the new Delta Hotels location in Southlake, is ready for its first big holiday.

The restaurant will serve a $125 three-course dinner Feb. 12-14, featuring a choice of steak-and-lobster, lemon sole with crab legs, or pan-seared scallops.

The appetizers include lobster bisque or oysters, For dessert, there’s a passion-fruit creme brulee with red-velvet lava cake.

The chef is Enam Chowdhury, with Fearing consulting on the new hotel.

The Delta is at 251 Texas 114 East; 254-727-0811, skycreekkitchen.com.

If you mention Fearing, you have to talk about Pyles.

Pyles is doing a special Valentine’s week menu for Fireside Pies, served beginning Feb. 11 and continuing through Feb. 20.

The three-course dinner costs $55 per person with tenderloin or $45 with salmon. The starter is butternut squash soup, and dessert is butterscotch pudding with salted caramel.

It’s available as takeout for safe home dining or served

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Cedar Rapids area restaurants rely on loyal customers, new ideas to survive pandemic

By Dorothy de Souza Guedes, correspondent

Jennifer Goodlove’s business got a boost from an unexpected source during the pandemic — gnomes.

“The gnomes and takeout are what saved me last year and this year,” Goodlove said. “We’re talking thousands of gnomes.”

She stocks decorative gnomes for every season and occasion at Farmer’s Daughter’s Market, a restaurant, market and gift shop at 495 Miller Rd., Hiawatha.

“We have a lot of repeat customers. What we saw this year, last year was people picking and choosing who they want to support,” Goodlove said. “They go out of their way.”

2020 was challenging for restaurants and bars that had to start thinking outside the box once the pandemic hit and restrictions to prevent the spread of COVID-19 were put in place.

For Goodlove, new ideas increased sales, but not everyone was as lucky. January was a record-breaking month for the Farmer’s Daughter’s Market, the best in 13 years — and up 23 percent over 2020.

Goodlove, who spent years in human resources before returning to Iowa from Chicago, thinks that because she had no preconceived notions about what’s not possible, she’s been more willing to try new ideas.

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Boston-area restaurants are offering subscriptions to keep their kitchens busy during the pandemic

Restaurants have been trying everything they can think of to stay afloat throughout the pandemic. One of the latest ideas arrives fresh from the farm.



a close up of food on a table: The contents of a vegetarian subscription box at Oleana in Cambridge.


© Lane Turner/Globe Staff
The contents of a vegetarian subscription box at Oleana in Cambridge.

Chef Ana Sortun, of Oleana, Sofra, and Sarma, believes so deeply in serving local, seasonal produce that she fell in love with the farmer growing her vegetables. Her husband, Chris Kurth, owns Sudbury’s Siena Farms, named for their daughter. The farm is known for glorious sunflowers, a vibrant presence at local farmers’ markets, and CSA shares stocked with high-quality produce.


Project Takeout | Devra First: Get takeout. It’s your civic duty

CSA stands for “community supported agriculture,” and if you haven’t yet participated in a program, you’ve probably heard of the concept. Consumers invest in a local farm, purchasing a share of the season’s harvest. The benefits are many: The customer receives regular boxes of just-harvested local produce, the farmer gets paid upfront, and both participate in a relationship that connects the parties to the land and one another, enriching the transactions of buying and selling food.

The pandemic has been a boom time for community supported agriculture,

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