Affordable housing shows no impact on real estate values in Colorado Springs neighborhoods, study shows | Homeless

As Colorado Springs City Council members on Tuesday consider approving the spending plan for incoming federal Housing and Urban Development funding, a new map shows property values have not decreased in any city neighborhood because of affordable housing projects. 

The information refutes what’s often the leading cause of neighborhood opposition to such development.

“According to the data we have, there is not a single place in the city of Colorado Springs where a low-income project has brought down property values in the last five years,” said Steve Posey, HUD program manager.

That’s also not the case in other states, said Daryn Murphy, vice president of development for Wisconsin-based Commonwealth Development Corp.

“We hear that argument quite often, but we haven’t seen where it actually plays out,” he said.

At least six sections of the city where tax-credited affordable-housing projects have been built are among the neighborhoods that have seen property values increase the most in recent years, Posey noted.

City officials expect to receive an estimated $5 million in HUD funding to address priorities for affordable housing, homelessness prevention, economic development, nonprofit assistance and improvements in low-income neighborhoods. The funding starts April 1 and covers the second year of a

Read More

Lucas Interior Embraces Color to Modernize a Palm Springs Spanish Revival Home

The work of Lucas Interior, a Seattle-based studio helmed by siblings Suzie and David Lucas, has been characterized by serene hues and sweeping yet spare architectural lines. If there is ever a sense of drama, it’s typically achieved purely through volume and geometry. But that’s not how the Lucases approached their latest project, a Spanish Mission Revival home in Palm Springs that packs a colorful punch. “Our clients told us to go crazy and that’s just what we did,” says Suzie Lucas, half-jokingly. “We even had to dial it back at one point.”

The clients, real estate developer Jim John and his husband, Craig Hartzman, an art collector and philanthropist, already owned two homes in the Pacific Northwest that were rather sober and minimalist. At their new California retreat, they wanted to embrace the artistic spirit and carefree ethos of Palm Springs, exploring color, pattern, and the art of mismatching.

“My husband wanted to preserve the old Spanish style of the house, but I grew up in Santa Barbara surrounded by terra-cotta and I really needed something different from that,” quips Hartzman. “Eventually, we said, ‘Let’s make it Spanish but on steroids.’”

This informal dining area, used mostly for wine

Read More