Big Real-Estate Firms Turn Buyers of Their Own Shares

Some publicly traded real-estate companies have found a buyer for their shares, despite empty offices, deserted hotels and reeling shopping malls—the companies themselves.

Real-estate owners, including

SL Green Realty Corp.

and

Healthcare Trust of America Inc.,

say stock-market investors have significantly undervalued their property holdings compared with what they could fetch in the private market. While some of these companies authorized buying back their own shares even before the coronavirus pandemic, they are betting that with a vaccine rollout under way, travel, office work and mall shopping will bounce back after a terrible year for major property types.

Brookfield Asset Management Inc.

took this strategy one step further last week, when it offered to buy the nearly 40{ac967ad544075fb2f6bcea1234f8d91da186cac15e616dc329e302b7c7326b8c} stake in

Brookfield Property Partners

LP it doesn’t already own for $5.9 billion. Brookfield Property, which BAM spun off about eight years ago, is one of the world’s largest real-estate investors and owns the giant office and retail complexes Brookfield Place in New York and London’s Canary Wharf.

The stock market “doesn’t properly value or appreciate the quality of the assets that we own,”

Brian Kingston,

managing partner of BAM’s real-estate group, said last week.

Shares of public mall and office companies

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Volunteer interior designers turn girls’ shelter from drab to dreamy for teens escaping sex trafficking



a person holding a wine glass: Designer Lisa Ball put up a new painting in a former office space, assisted by Bridget Zak. The volunteers turned institutional decor into colorful and fun spaces to welcome the girls.


© Star Tribune/Star Tribune/Photos by RICHARD TSONG-TAATARII • richard.tsong-taatarii@startribune.com/…
Designer Lisa Ball put up a new painting in a former office space, assisted by Bridget Zak. The volunteers turned institutional decor into colorful and fun spaces to welcome the girls.

Could big comfy pillows, colorful bedding and rugs, freshly painted walls and decorative art help protect girls from abuse and exploitation?

Maybe.

In fact, it’s the hope of the staff of Brittany’s Place, a shelter for child victims of sex trafficking. The shelter got a free makeover this month when a volunteer group of professional interior designers turned stark bedrooms and lounges into bright, cheerful, teen-friendly places where girls can enjoy hanging out — and maybe stick around a while longer.



a person holding a wine glass: Designer Lisa Ball put up a new painting in a former office space, assisted by Bridget Zak. The volunteers turned institutional decor into colorful and fun spaces to welcome the girls.


© Star Tribune/Star Tribune/Photos by RICHARD TSONG-TAATARII • richard.tsong-taatarii@startribune.com/…
Designer Lisa Ball put up a new painting in a former office space, assisted by Bridget Zak. The volunteers turned institutional decor into colorful and fun spaces to welcome the girls.

The girls at Brittany’s Place can move in or out as they wish. Temptations to leave, perhaps to reconnect with the very people who exploited them, can be dismayingly strong. Late one night last year, a sex trafficker stood

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16 ways to turn your home into a plant-filled haven

Looking for indoor garden ideas? We’re not surprised! After all, we’ve all been spending a lot more time between our own four walls this year. Wouldn’t it be nice to give it all a freshen up with a load of leafy green foliage, and maybe a bloom or two?



a room filled with furniture and vase of flowers on a table: null


© Provided by gardening etc.
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Although many of us are lucky enough to have an outdoor space to call our own, some of us city folk are, well, lacking in the garden department. If that’s the case, maybe our garden design ideas have got you pining for some green-fingered action of your own. But that’s okay – whatever your outside-space situation, nothing can stop you creating a plant-filled sanctuary indoors! And even if you’ve got an outside plot sorted, there’s always a reason to welcome more plants into your world.

‘Plants don’t just have to be laid out in garden areas or as patio plants – any environment can benefit from the vibrancy and health benefits of plants,’ says the team at Indoor Garden Design. ‘No matter what the environment, plants and plant holders can be styled to suit the aesthetic of your space.’

So, why not fill your shelves

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When you miss gardening, turn to these books for comfort and inspiration

CORVALLIS – If you can’t garden, why not read about it? Books bring us comfort when the gloomy weather of winter is upon us. Even gardeners who love winter enjoy a good read.

Add a fire and a cup of tea and relax with one of these 11 books recommended by Oregon State University Extension Service horticulturists. There is something for every reader – a memoir by Hope Jahren tells the story of two scientists and their love for trees; Extension’s popular “Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington” is heavy with photos of both coniferous and deciduous trees; Olivier Flippi writes about the important subject of gardening in dry climates; and a book on short-season vegetable gardening is perfect for central and eastern Oregon gardeners.

Since we couldn’t seem to stop at 10, we’ve given you a list of 11. They’d make fine holiday gifts. Find them online, or check with your local library or bookstores.

“The Gardener’s Atlas,” Dr. John Grimshaw

“For gardeners who love to know the origin of all their favorite plants this is a gem of information. It probes into the history and origin of these plants and who discovered them. The author makes the

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Turn to gardening books for comfort and inspiration



a sign in the middle of a forest: Gardening and tree books can help while away the winter until spring returns


© COURTESY OF OREGON STATE EXTENSION
Gardening and tree books can help while away the winter until spring returns

If you can’t garden, why not read about it? Books bring us comfort when the gloomy weather of winter is upon us. Even gardeners who love winter enjoy a good read.

Since we couldn’t seem to stop at 10, we’ve given you a list of 11. They’d make fine holiday gifts. Find them online, or check with your local library or bookstores.

“The Gardeners,” Dr. John Grimshaw

“For gardeners who love to know the origin of all their favorite plants this is a gem of information. It probes into the history and origin of these plants and who discovered them. The author makes the sharing of plant discovery since the 1500s very entertaining and educates the reader on how many of these ornamental plants were also used for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. The book is filled with excellent photos and maps of plant origins to support the storytelling.”

— Steve Reinquist, OSU Extension horticulturist, Douglas County

“Trees to Know in Oregon and Washington,” Ed Jensen, Oregon State University Extension Service

“I really like “Trees to Know in Oregon.”  It is a

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